CSSR General

The Relationship between Mental Health and Socioeconomic Status: Depressive Symptoms among Adults in South Africa

Seminar
10 October, 2017 - 12:45 to 14:00
Kinyanjui Mungai.PhD, UWC
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

Mental disorders are estimated to be experienced by one out of three South Africans in their lifetime. (Stein, Seedat, Herman, Moomal, Heeringa, Kessler & Williams, 2009:3). Empirical studies indicate, that people, who are poor, live in impoverished neighbourhoods, have lower education levels and are subsequently more likely to have mental disorders. This study focuses on depression. Empirical studies point to depression being negatively correlated with socioeconomic determinants, but is this the case in South Africa?
From a theoretical standpoint the study considers how socio-structural aspects such as poverty and educational outcomes (amongst other socioeconomic variables) can lead to the prevalence and persistence of depressive symptoms. The main question the study aimed to investigate was whether depression was negatively related to socioeconomic status, and through which pathways does socioeconomic status affect depression.


This study used panel data from the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS) to examine the socioeconomic determinants of depressive symptoms. Waves 1 (2008) and 4 (2014/2015) of the NIDS data were used to answer the research question. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 10-item version of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The scale measured depressive symptomatology. The cut off that was used was a score of 10 or higher, which indicated the occurrence of significant depressive symptoms. In order to assess which socioeconomic determinants increase the probability of experiencing significant depressive symptoms, a probit model was used to make this investigation.
The results of the study indicate that, despite the recent increase in depression in 2012 and 2014/2015, the overall prevalence of depression in South Africa has declined significantly between 2008 and 2014/2015. Socioeconomic status was found to be negatively associated with depression. In particular, a low income and occupational status were associated with a significantly greater probability of being depressed. Disparities in depression outcomes followed the disparities in socioeconomic status. Hence the study found that women and Africans were particularly vulnerable to depression as they were socioeconomically disadvantaged.


Presenter biography: Kinyanjui Mungai is currently an economics PhD student at the University of The Western Cape. He completed a Masters in Commerce (Economics) at UWC in 2016. Much of the presentation will include some of the research He conducted as part of his dissertation which was supervised by Dr Amiena Bayat. Kinyanjui Mungai also has a Bachelor of Commerce and Honours in Economics at the University of The Western Cape. His current research interests are in financial inclusion.

Politics and Business as (un)usual? The Electoral Performance of Businessmen Presidential Candidates in Africa and Latin America

Seminar
5 September, 2017 - 12:45 to 14:00
Dr Robert Nyenhuis
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

With the election of Donald Trump in the 2016 US Presidential contest, analysts struggled to put forth a series of explanations to account for the seemingly surprising result. The dominant narrative in much of the discourse is that the billionaire’s victory represents an electoral anomaly of sorts. However, a more comprehensive examination of global politics (Africa, Latin America) demonstrates the empirical reality that businessmen candidates throughout the world have considerable electoral success. In this project, I develop and test an original theory designed to account for these candidates’ electoral success—that businessmen candidates have greater electoral success when citizens hold high levels of admiration for entrepreneurs and favor neoliberal macro-economic policies. 

Presenter biography: Dr Nyenhuis is a faculty member in the Department of Political Science at Cal Poly Ponoma. He is currently working on a book on why Latin American voters for populist presidential candidates, and research projects on citizen’s voting behaviour in presidential systems
 

Patrons, clients, brokers and populists: Research in South Africa and Latin America

Seminar
8 August, 2017 - 14:00 to 16:30
Professor Robert Mattes, Sarah Lockwood, and Dr. Robert Nyenhuis
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

 Institute for Democracy, Citizenship and Public Policy in Africa will host a composite seminar with Professor Robert Mattes, Sarah Lockwood, and Dr. Robert Nyenhuis. Professor Mattes will present work exploring the patron-client relationship between MPs and constituents. Ms. Lockwood will discuss protest brokers in South African cities. And Dr. Nyenhuis will speak about his research on populism in Latin America.

 

 

Internship with International Enterprise Singapore

IE Singapore is the government agency driving Singapore’s external economy. For the past 30 years, we have been spearheading the overseas growth of Singapore-based companies and promoting international trade. Our vision is a thriving business hub in Singapore with Globally Competitive Companies and leading international traders. Our global network of overseas centres in over 39 locations provides the necessary connections in many developed and emerging markets. Our Johannesburg office is based in Sandton Central and covers 9 countries in the Southern Africa region.

Politics in Ghana: The 2016 elections and their aftermath

Workshop
3 August, 2017 - 11:00 to 4 August, 2017 - 14:00
The new Institute for Democracy, Citizenship and Public Policy in Africa, together with the Department of Political Studies at UCT
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

Politics in Ghana:
The 2016 elections and their aftermath

UCT, 3-4 August 2017

The new Institute for Democracy, Citizenship and Public Policy in Africa, together with the Department of Political Studies at UCT, is holding a workshop on Politics in Ghana. This small, focused workshop will examine the December 2016 elections, the political context, and the implications of the election and change of government for policy-making and implementation.

The workshop will be held on August 3rd and 4th in the Centre for Social Science Research Seminar Room, Leslie Social Science Building room 4.29, Upper Campus.

Contact IDCPPA@uct.ac.za for more details.

 

              

Cake and coffee with Chris Saunders and Jeremy Seekings at the Institute for Democracy, Citizenship and Public Policy in Africa Tuesday 11 July, 10am

Seminar
11 July, 2017 - 10:00 to 12:30
Chris Saunders and Jeremy Seekings
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

On Tuesday 11 July at 10 am the Institute will be hosting a coffee and cake discussion with Chris Saunders and Jeremy Seekings. Chris and Jeremy will reflect on what they learned about the state of African Studies across Europe at the European African Studies Conference held in late June.

Chris Saunders is an Emeritus Professor with a special interest in the recent political history of the SADC countries.

Jeremy Seekings is Professor of Political Studies and Sociology and Interim Director of the new Institute for Democracy, Citizenship and Public Policy in Africa.

 

 

 

Cake and coffee with Ndangwa Noyoo at the Institute for Democracy, Citizenship and Public Policy in Africa

Seminar
13 June, 2017 - 10:00 to 12:30
Ndangwa Noyoo
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

 

On Tuesday 13 June at 10 am the Institute will be hosting a coffee and cake discussion with Ndangwa Noyoo, Associate Professor in the Department of Social Development, UCT. Ndangwa will speak about his work on innovative strategies for development in Southern and West Africa.

Ndangwa’s interest is in scholarly work that can liberate Africans from chronic poverty, hunger and destitution, as well as work that challenges tyranny in Africa and spurs people to action against dictatorships and autocratic regimes. His two current projects are on indigenous social security systems in Southern and West Africa, and social welfare and social work in Southern Africa. Both projects will culminate in books.

Ndangwa Noyoo is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Development at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Previously, he worked for the University of Johannesburg and for the South African Government as a Senior Social Policy Specialist/Chief Director in the National Department of Social Development. Prior to this, he was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Work at the University of the Witwatersrand. He has published widely in the areas of social policy, social development and related fields, especially, in the context of Africa and Southern Africa.

Please join us in the CSSR Seminar Room, Room 4.29 Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building.


 

Civil Society Observation of the violation of the Electoral Code of Conduct during the 2016 South African Local Government Elections.

Seminar
13 June, 2017 - 12:45 to 14:00
Nkosikhulule Xhawulengweni Nyembezi
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

The administration of the 2016 local government elections in South Africa has been celebrated as yet another important contributor to the delivery of free and fair elections. Yet competitive elections, an essential component of any democratic system, require more than smooth running administrative systems. Competitive elections require conditions that create a climate of tolerance, free political campaigning, and open public debate. An election without freedom to campaign is doomed to be stunted and inefficient as the right to freedom of expression is one of a web of mutually supporting rights the Constitution affords to citizens. This paper presents an analysis of narrative reports on instances of violations of the Electoral Code of Conduct, including intimidation and violence, gathered by Civil Society violence monitors and election observers from 1 March until 31 September 2016. The analysis reveals that whilst the vast majority of South Africans can vote and express their opinions without fear of retribution, there are underlying tensions militating against constitutionally protected political rights. When viewed  in conjunction with the Afrobarometer survey data (2016) on perceptions of political space in South Africa, in the context of Diamond and Morlino’s minimum requirements for democracy, it becomes clear that pre-election campaign space is fragile and not given, and will therefore need to be nurtured in future elections.

Presenter biography: Nkosikhulule Xhawulengweni Nyembezi is a PhD Candidate in Public Law, a policy analyst, a researcher, and a human rights activist. His research interests are in the areas of Electoral Democracy and Good Governance, Socio-Economic Rights, Anti-Corruption Institutional Frameworks, and Early Childhood Development.

He has been involved in the coordination of civil society election-monitoring programmes in the national, provincial and local government since 1994, and serves as the Co-Chairperson of the National Co-ordinating Forum – a platform that brings together civil society formations and the Independent Electoral Commission. He also served as a community representative in the Development Chamber of the National Economic Development and Labour Council.
 

Civil Society Observation of the violation of the Electoral Code of Conduct during the 2016 South African Local Government Elections.

Seminar
13 June, 2017 - 12:45 to 14:00
Nkosikhulule Xhawulengweni Nyembezi
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

The administration of the 2016 local government elections in South Africa has been celebrated as yet another important contributor to the delivery of free and fair elections. Yet competitive elections, an essential component of any democratic system, require more than smooth running administrative systems. Competitive elections require conditions that create a climate of tolerance, free political campaigning, and open public debate. An election without freedom to campaign is doomed to be stunted and inefficient as the right to freedom of expression is one of a web of mutually supporting rights the Constitution affords to citizens. This paper presents an analysis of narrative reports on instances of violations of the Electoral Code of Conduct, including intimidation and violence, gathered by Civil Society violence monitors and election observers from 1 March until 31 September 2016. The analysis reveals that whilst the vast majority of South Africans can vote and express their opinions without fear of retribution, there are underlying tensions militating against constitutionally protected political rights. When viewed in conjunction with the Afrobarometer survey data (2016) on perceptions of political space in South Africa, in the context of Diamond and Morlino’s minimum requirements for democracy, it becomes clear that pre-election campaign space is fragile and not given, and will, therefore, need to be nurtured in future elections.

Presenter biography: Nkosikhulule Xhawulengweni Nyembezi is a Ph.D. Candidate in Public Law, a policy analyst, a researcher, and a human rights activist. His research interests are in the areas of Electoral Democracy and Good Governance, Socio-Economic Rights, Anti-Corruption Institutional Frameworks, and Early Childhood Development.
He has been involved in the coordination of civil society election-monitoring programmes in the national, provincial and local government since 1994, and serves as the Co-Chairperson of the National Co-ordinating Forum – a platform that brings together civil society formations and the Independent Electoral Commission. He also served as a community representative in the Development Chamber of the National Economic Development and Labour Council.

‘Aliens’ on the Copperbelt: Citizenship, national identity and non-Zambian Africans in the mining industry

Seminar
6 June, 2017 - 12:45 to 14:00
Duncan Money
CSSR Seminar Room 4.29, Level 4 Leslie Social Science Building, Upper Campus
Abstract / Description: 

This paper explores the removal of several thousand non-Zambian Africans from the mining industry following Zambian independence in 1964. This process has been curiously overlooked among the multitude of detailed studies on the mining industry and the policy of ‘Zambianization’, a policy usually regarded as being about the removal of the industrial colour bar on the mines. Yet the replacement of ‘alien Africans’ with Zambian nationals was a key objective of the Zambian Government. This sits uneasily with two aspects of the existing literature. The first is the assumption, in both academic literature and popular understanding, that Zambia is a place largely devoid of ethnic and nationalist tensions. The second is the emphasis on the development of a robust sense of class consciousness among the Copperbelt’s African mineworkers. Understanding why and how non-Zambians were removed from the mining industry also speaks to wider themes about the creation of citizenship and national identity. For one, this policy presupposed that the state and mining companies could reliably distinguish between the recently created categories of Zambian, Malawian, and Tanzanian, though this was not always the case. Moreover, demands that economic opportunities within national boundaries should be restricted to those regarded as legitimate members of that nation remain commonplace, and not only in Africa.

Presenter biography: Duncan Money is a historian of Central and Southern Africa with a particular interest in the mining industry. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Studies Group, University of the Free State and was awarded his DPhil in 2016 from the University of Oxford for his thesis on a social history of European migrants on the Zambian Copperbelt. His current research focuses on preparing his doctoral dissertation as a monograph and beginning a project on a comparative history of mining regions in southern Africa.

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